Category Archives: Safety

How Older Adults Can Stay Healthy During COVID-19

(reprinted and edited with permission from Redfin)

In the age of COVID-19, more colloquially known as the Coronavirus, and as an older adult, your health and personal safety have never been more important. The world seems very different than it was just weeks ago, but the rise of a pandemic just reaffirms what is most important: friends, family, and your health. Social distancing can be stressful, but it is among the best ways to minimize risk to both you and those around you. If you are stuck at home during these trying times, follow these health and wellness tips for older adults to stay healthy during this coronavirus pandemic.

Get Some Exercise

Exercise may be the furthest thing from your mind while stuck inside, especially while handling the stress of rapidly changing circumstances. However, even a little movement can do wonders for your overall mental, physical, and emotional health.

Depending on your physical abilities, there are many different kinds of things you can do to exercise without leaving the house. From going up and down the stairs a few times to walking laps in your home or even jogging in place, doing jumping jacks (yup, remember doing them as a kid), or just siting down and getting up from a chair numerous times, a little physical movement goes a long way in helping you feel your best. The internet is full of programs, too; fitness apps, streaming sites, and even YouTube offer countless avenues for at-home workouts at all levels of intensity and ability.

Get Plenty of Sleep

Keeping your immune system healthy is vital important and sleep is a key component of good maintenance. Sleeping seems like a simple thing to achieve while spending all day at home, but day after day without the routines of jobs, hobbies, and social outings can make time seem meaningless. It is easy to slip into negative habits, like going to bed too late out of a desire to catch just one more episode of your favorite show.

No matter what your at-home habits look like, try to establish a regular time to go to sleep and to get up in the morning. This can feel a little silly at first, especially if you have nowhere to go, but maintaining a schedule can keep your circadian rhythm in check, helping you to stay both mentally and physically healthy.

Eat Healthy Meals

Being stuck inside all day with nowhere to go can make it easy to justify a little extra junk food, but a healthy and balanced diet is a critical part of your wellness. Overall, your diet plays an important role in sustaining your immune system, so eating a steady diet of potato chips while practicing social distancing can cause you more harm than good.

When planning meals, make sure to include as many leafy greens as possible in addition to servings of fruit and protein. If regular access to fresh produce is limited, frozen alternatives are a fine substitute. Include a daily vitamin as well to hit on all the nutrients you may not be getting through diet alone. Maintaining a healthy diet is a vital part of older adults staying healthy during coronavirus.

Find New Hobbies

Sometimes, daily life feels too busy to find time to learn new skills or experiment with new leisure activities. Now, without a way to fall back on the same old habits and duties that have kept you distracted, there’s plenty of time to try something new.

Even without going outside, there are plenty of ways for older adults to stay busy at home. You could consider joining a virtual book club, taking open online courses on platforms like Coursera or edX to learn new skills or brush up on old ones. Learning to sew, knit, or cross-stitch, taking up puzzles, baking, canning, cooking elaborate dishes, or even playing virtual card games with friends online. With more free time to devote to the little things in life, you can find new ways to enjoy your leisure time.

Keep in Touch

Not being able to see friends, children, grandchildren, and extended family members can make you feel isolated if you live alone. Humans are social animals and extended distancing from necessary social interaction is often uncomfortable or distressing. Luckily, technology makes it possible to stay in touch, whether your family is across the street or around the world.

From Skype to FaceTime, it’s possible to stay connected with your friends and family, without meeting up in person. Even texting can be a great way to check-in. A simple message to a loved one and a kind response can be enough to create the kind of connection you’re missing while staying at home and staying healthy during coronavirus.

Make Plans for the Future

Staying at home and socially distancing yourself may feel like a very uncertain set of circumstances, but there’s good news: it won’t last forever. Sooner or later, the world will right itself, and life will go back to normal. And when it does, what do you want to do?

From trips to Florida with friends to dinners with your family, it’s important to think about the light at the end of the tunnel. The things you miss doing now will be available soon, so don’t let yourself be consumed by stress that can come with this challenging situation. Think up a meal plan for a family dinner, research venues for your next family reunion, or put together an itinerary for your dream vacation. It’s easier to be happier at home when you have something to look forward to.

Check-In With Yourself

It can be overwhelming to have your whole world change essentially overnight, especially when you don’t know what the immediate future may hold. In these times, it’s important to check in with yourself and make sure you are meeting your basic needs.

Do you feel emotionally healthy? Physically healthy? How is your morale?

By taking time to evaluate your wellbeing as well as your individual needs, it becomes easier to keep your health headed in the right direction. Don’t be afraid to reach out for help, the increase in telehealth services makes it easy to speak to your physician or a licensed counselor without leaving your home.

Staying as healthy as possible is always important, but now more than ever your focus should be on remaining as resilient as possible. With these tips for older adults to stay healthy during coronavirus, you can make the most of your time at home.

About the Author
is part of the content marketing team at Redfin and enjoys writing about real estate and design trends. Her dream home would be a contemporary home with an open floor plan, lots of windows, and a waterfront view.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

COVID-19 Guide for Caregivers

To all future and current caregivers,

You may not know this, but you are so valuable to us and to the folks that you care for, and we want to ensure that you have what you need and that you will continue to stay healthy yourself.

In our opinion, half the battle is understanding what is going on, what can WE do to protect ourselves and our family AND the community that we care for. Here is some guidance regarding the symptoms of COVID-19, how it spreads and how it is treated (click this link to download a PDF: COVID-19 Precautions & Testing}. We have also included some information regarding managing anxiety and fears, the myths and facts as well as a way to screen yourself DAILY.

It is important to us that you know you have our support and that you will not be asked to work if you are experiencing a cough, sore throat, fever, or shortness of breath.

We hope you will read the information, keep it with you if you wish and by all means HEED THE CALL by asking yourself the 3 most important questions:

  • Do I have a cough, sore throat, fever or shortness of breath?
  • Have I just returned from international travel?
  • Have I been close to anyone suspected or diagnosed with COVID-19?

If you can say “Yes” to any of these questions, you may be at risk for carrying or developing COVID-19 and you need to report it to your local health department or MD so that the CDC and WHO can take the next steps.

With all of the questions, fears and talk around town and the nation; most importantly, TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY! If you suspect that you might be sick are have been in contact with someone who is sick (or has symptoms), DON’T KEEP IT A SECRET!! The group of folks we care for are either elderly or possibly dealing with issues that do not allow their bodies to heal themselves and again, YOU ARE SO VALUABLE TO US AND TO THEM.

Thank you in advance for reading this, heeding the call and passing this forward.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

Ready to Downsize? What to Look for in Your Next Home

The nest has been empty for some time, and as you get older you have to ask yourself if you are you ready to finally take the plunge on your senior downsize? Most older adults know they will have to disencumber and downsize eventually, but they often put it off since it is such a daunting task. However, moving sooner rather than later gives you the time and flexibility you need to find the right home and settle in.

This post explains what to look for when buying your downsized home and how you can make sure your next home is your “forever home” and one where you can age-in-place.

Finding the Right Home for Senior Living

For seniors, downsizing involves more than shrinking their square footage. When looking for a downsized home, seniors are also searching for a house that offers convenience and accessibility for senior living. That means features such as:

  • Proximity to shopping, healthcare, and public transportation.
  • A safe, walkable community.
  • Level covered parking.
  • No stairs, Single Story.
  • Wide doorways and hallways or an open floor plan.
  • No high-pile carpeting or slick tile floors.
  • Ample lighting, especially natural light.
  • Elevated kitchen and laundry appliances.
  • Two-level kitchen counters.
  • Roll-in showers.

It is hard to find a home that checks every box, so it is critical that older home buyers work with real estate agents who understand their needs and specializes in finding homes that are more appropriate for seniors or near-seniors. An agent who is certified as a Senior Real Estate Specialist (SRES) is the best choice, but if it is not possible to hire an SRES, interview agents to assess their experience working with senior home buyers.

Preparing Your New Home for Senior Living

The features listed above cover the priority items seniors need for the downsizing plans and in their home, but it is not everything that makes a house safe, secure, and age-friendly. Below are some common changes seniors need to make when moving to a new home.

Accessibility Upgrades

Your goal when buying a home is to avoid properties that need major remodeling, but that does not mean you can escape all home improvements. There are a lot of little changes that improve a senior’s comfort, convenience, and safety at home, with a total remodel such as:

  • Replacing traditional light switches with rocker switches.
  • Replacing door and cabinet knobs with levers and pulls.
  • Installing grab bars in bathrooms (showers / toilets).
  • Installing task lighting / motion lighting
  • Building a parcel bench near the main entrance.
  • Automating home functions like lights and locks with smart technology.

Depending on your health and/or skill level, you may want to complete these improvements before moving in or budget for them one at a time. If you want to tackle renovations before move-in but your home is already sold, book a vacation rental for a short-term housing solution. You can even rent a property near activities you would enjoy and make a “mini staycation” out of it. As Turnkey reminds, Austin (and most cities), have plenty to keep you busy, from the area’s many gorgeous lakes to sporting events at the University of Texas to great restaurants to scenic walkways. What you do is totally up to you.

Landscaping

Time outdoors is great for seniors’ well-being, but most older adults are not up for the routine task of maintaining a lawn and garden. That is not a problem if you are considering an assisted living facility or 55-plus community where the grounds are maintained by staff. However, if have decided to purchase a home, you will most likely want to budget and hire a landscape designer to create an accessible outdoor space where you can sit, stroll, and even garden in raised beds. If you are working with a sloped lawn, consider grading it to improve accessibility. In Austin, you costs run between $1,157 and $2,837 depending on the size and scope of the project.

In-Home Care

Aging-in-place seniors may still need an extra hand at home. Even if you are getting along fine today, you may need assistance with housekeeping or home healthcare in the future. Start thinking about how you pay for the care you need so you’re prepared when the time comes. Depending on your needs, in-home care could cost $150 per day / $750 per week if you decide to you a private duty agency, as their average rate is $27 per hour with usually a 4 hour minimum. If you decide to hire a caregiver yourself and use a service like Well Beyond Care, with no minimums, you could reduce your daily / weekly spend to $30 per and $100 per week. Saving from $10,000 to $30,000 per year in care costs.

The decision to downsize is never an easy one, but for most seniors, it usually the right one. In a smaller, more accessible home, you can enjoy your senior years without being burdened by upkeep or a home you do not feel safe living in. Downsizing can be a lengthy process, however. Between searching for the right home, renovating to make it move-in ready, and packing up the old house, a senior’s downsizing may take a year or more from start to finish. Rather than putting it off, start taking the first steps toward your senior downsize today.

There are more and more companies and individuals out there to to help seniros and families with downsizing. These companies offer plans and checklists to ease the transition from one home to another. Companies like Downsize My Home, offer advice and guidance, as well as resources to make the process of downsizing as smooth and pain-free as possible.
Image via Unsplash

About the Author
Mike Longsdon provides advice to seniors on downsizing and aging in place as a contributor to Elder Freedom.  He is also an expert on topics like tackling home accessibility modifications, how to find a great contractor, and the benefits of aging in place to name a few.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

The Healthy Senior’s Guide to Foot Care (Infographic)

As we age, maintaining good foot health is vital to our well being, comfort and mobility.

For many people aged over 65, keeping up good foot health can be a challenge and one quarter of all seniors are affected by foot pain. Fortunately, many foot ailments are entirely avoidable by taking a few simple precautions. If you are aged 65+ and are interested in discovering more about foot care, we recommend that you read this helpful infographic provided by Walsh Brothers Shoes which lays out some of the most effective ways to keep your feet healthy and happy as we age.

Maintaining good foot hygiene will help keep foot problems at bay and may even cause some of them disappear altogether. Keep feet fresh by wearing clean, dry socks everyday and by switching up your footwear. Wash your feet thoroughly a few times a week and take extra care to dry and moisturize regularly.

Exercise is one of the best ways to maintain good foot health. However, if your feet are hurting chances are the prospect of physical activity does not seem appealing. It is worth bearing in mind that with reduced exercise comes loss of muscle mass and strength; reduced endurance; and higher risk of diseases related to a sedentary lifestyle. Walking is best way to exercise your feet, but if you cannot go outside, there are also many simple stretches that you can try at home.

As we get older, it becomes increasingly important to pay attention to our feet as they can indicate a wide range of ailments. Check your feet frequently and arrange to see a doctor or foot specialist if you notice anything out of the ordinary.

Take a look at this infographic to learn more about foot health and care for senior citizens.  Here is to you good health.

Signs Your Loved One Needs Care

As individuals age, many of the things they used to do with ease sometimes become much more difficult to do.  Acknowledging the need for help and then accepting assistance is not easy for individuals as they get older. Often, the decision and responsibility falls on Aging Motherone or more family members to recognize the signs that your loved one might need support and aide in completing the activities of daily living. Many of these include simple tasks such as bathing, dressing, and cooking.

So, how do you know if it is time for in-home care for your loved one? There are some obvious signs that could signal a red flag that are listed below.  One may not be enough, but when these come in combination you should seriously look to have a caregiver aide in the home.

Reduction in Physical Abilities and/or Mental Status

  • Difficulty keeping track of time / forgetting appointments
  • Sleeping for most of the day / not waking properly
  • Poor diet or weight loss
  • Rapid weight gain
  • Loss of interest in hobbies, activities or in socializing
  • Uncertainty and confusion when performing once-familiar tasks
  • Changes in mood or extreme mood swings
  • Difficulty getting up from a seated position
  • Difficulty with walking, balance and mobility
  • Unexplained bruising or injuries from falls or hitting furniture
  • Forgetfulness, including forgetting to take medications or taking incorrect dosages
  • Consistent use of poor judgment (e.g. falling for scams or sales pitches, giving away money)

Deterioration in Personal Hygiene

  • Unpleasant body odor due to infrequent showering or bathing
  • A smell of urine in the house or on clothing
  • Noticeable decline in grooming habits and personal care (e.g. unkempt hair, untrimmed nails, lack of oral care, wearing dirty or stained clothing)

Neglecting Household Responsibilities and Upkeep

  • Inability to independently complete Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)
  • Little or no fresh, healthy food in the fridge
  • Unkept, uncleaned house and/or extreme clutter
  • Unwashed laundry piling up
  • Stains or wet spots on furniture or carpet
  • Spoiled or outdated food that does not get thrown away
  • Stacks of unopened mail or an overflowing mailbox
  • Late payment notices, bounced checks and calls from bill collectors
  • Utilities being turned off due to missed payments

Hiring a Caregiver or Caregiving Service
If many of these indicators are present, it does not mean you have to place mom or dad into an assisted living or a nursing home facility. These are often very expensive and may not be the right choice.  However, these red flags do indicate that some form of daily supportive care is needed. You may have to consider hiring a private duty care agency, or as a much more affordable alternative, hire your own caregiver using a service such as Well Beyond Care.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

Private Duty Services for All!

Reprinted by permission from Elisabeth Hogue, Esq.; (877) 871-4062; ElizabethHogue@ElizabethHogue.net

In order to be appropriate for home care services of all types, patients must be able to care for themselves or have primary caregivers who can meet patients’ needs in between visits from professional staff from home care providers. This requirement is necessary in order to meet the eligibility of many payors, to avoid risk of legal liability and to help ensure quality of care.

Patients’ family members or others may be willing to serve as primary caregivers on a voluntary basis. If not, providers should offer patients and/or their family members the option to pay privately for primary caregivers. These services may be referred to as private duty or non-medical services.

The option to pay for private duty home care services should be offered to all patients who cannot care for themselves and who have no voluntary primary caregivers. Patients who can care for themselves or have voluntary primary caregivers may also wish to contract for additional assistance, so providers should offer this option to all patients who may benefit from these services.

Specifically, this means that:

  • Hospital discharge planners/case managers should offer private duty services to all patients who may benefit from them and assist patients to arrange for such services post-discharge as part of the discharge planning process.
  • Other types of institutional providers; such as skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), Long Term Acute Care Hospitals (LTACHs), and independent rehabilitation facilities (IRFs); should also offer patients who are being discharged the option to arrange for assistance from private duty agencies and should arrange for such services post-discharge.
  • Assisted living facilities (ALFs) should offer private duty services to all of their patients who may benefit from such services.
  • Home health agencies should offer patients the option to private pay for services if primary caregivers are no longer available to provide assistance and if patients no longer meet the eligibility requirements of payor sources.
  • Home health agencies, hospices and home medical equipment (HME) companies should educate patients about private duty services even though patients may have voluntary caregivers and help patients and their families arrange for these services.

Providers may be reluctant to offer these services to patients and their families because of their cost. They may also erroneously conclude that patients and their families cannot afford them. Providers should not jump to conclusions about who can afford these services. Instead, private duty home care services should be offered to all patients and their family members who may benefit from them.

A home health agency, for example, decided that a patient no longer met the eligibility requirements of the Medicare Program. The staff of the agency was reluctant to offer the patient the option to private pay for additional services prior to discharge because the patient lived in a “shack” and drove an old, beat-up truck. They did so anyway. To the staff’s surprise, upon receipt of the offer, the patient got out of bed, extracted a wad of cash from under the mattress and told the staff that there was plenty more money to pay for private duty services!

Private duty care has a very important role to play in the provision of home care services. This type of care should be offered to all patients whenever it seems that patients may benefit from it.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, Well Beyond Care. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

 

Hospital Discharge Planners and Recommendations of Post-Acute Providers

Reprinted by permission from Elisabeth Hogue, Esq.; (877) 871-4062; ElizabethHogue@ElizabethHogue.net

MedPAC advises Congress about Medicare. The Remington Report in the October 4, 2017, edition of FutureFocus reported that a MedPAC staff member stated as follows at MedPAC’s September, 2017, meeting:

“The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) requires hospitals to provide beneficiaries with a list of nearby SNFs and home health agencies but the list is not required to have quality information….Medicare statute provides beneficiaries with the freedom to choose their PAC provider, the law states that hospitals may not recommend providers (emphasis added).”

Then in the March 7, 2018, edition of FutureForcus, a link was provided to a power point presentation presented by MedPAC on March 1, 2018. A slide entitled “Discharge planning is a hospital responsibility” that was included in the presentation states as follows:

“…Hospital discharge planners may not recommend specific providers-beneficiaries have freedom to choose PAC providers.”

Is it true that hospital discharge planners are prohibited from recommending post-acute providers to patients based on applicable federal requirements? The answer is a resounding NO!

The basis for the remarks of members of the staff at MedPAC seems to be Conditions of Participation (CoPs) of the Medicare Program that establish requirements for hospital discharge planning. Specifically, 42 CFR 482.43(7) says that hospitals must not specify or otherwise limit the qualified providers that are available to patients.

But making recommendations to patients about post-acute providers while emphasizing patients’ right to choose providers does not necessarily entail “specifying” or “otherwise limiting” the providers available to patients. In fact, such discussions seem to be required by applicable national standards of care the Case Management Society of America and sanctioned by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Prohibiting these types of discussions also has practical implications for patients and their families.

Specifically, the Case Management Society of America (CMSA) first published Standards governing the practice of case management, including hospital discharge planners/case managers, in 1995. The Standards were revised in 2002, 2010 and 2016. Among other requirements, these standards require case managers to advocate on behalf of patients, including provision of assistance with making decisions about their care.

In addition, CMS sanctioned making recommendations to patients through the use of preferred providers. In final regulations of the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services at 80 Fed. Reg. 73274 (November 24, 2015), CMS says on Page 73518: “We agree that hospitals should be allowed to identify preferred providers and suppliers…”

CMS goes on to say on Page 73520 that:

“…hospitals, if desired, may recommend “preferred providers,” that is, high quality PAC providers/suppliers with whom they have relationships (either financial and/or clinical) for the purposes of improving quality, efficiency, or continuity of care.”

Finally, anecdotally, hospital discharge planners/case managers often report that patients are unable to choose post-acute providers when lists are presented to them. In light of MedPAC’s comments above, it sounds like discharge planners/case managers are unable to provide assistance to patients except perhaps to hand them the equivalent of a copy of the yellow pages! From a practical point of view, this dog will not hunt! In fact, the “heart” of the discharge planning process includes recommendations from discharge planners/case managers about the best choices for patients. Patients are, of course, free to reject these recommendations.

Case management/discharge planning activities are at the heart of our healthcare delivery system. These crucial activities are finally receiving the recognition and “due” that they deserve. They should not be mischaracterized!

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com.  The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

 

Common Diseases Seniors Face and Challenges in Providing Healthcare Solutions

Due to aging, diet, and living styles, seniors are more prone to degenerative diseases. As people age they become more susceptible to diseases and conditions that make even simple tasks difficult. Routine activities like grocery shopping, preparing meals and running errands become harder as we get older and adopt a sedentary lifestyle, which is why many elderly people seek assistance from caregivers. Though aging is a reality of life, it is important to know which specific diseases are most common among seniors in order to decide a course of action of prevention, and barring that, then which type of care or assistance is best for your needs.

According to a recent article in the New York Times, the most common diseases among seniors in the U.S. are Alzheimer’s or any other form of dementia, high blood pressure, heart disease, depression, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Each of these illnesses can have dramatic effects on the quality of life of seniors and their families. Caring for an aging parent with dementia or depression can be especially trying. And while there are some precautions one can take to avoid such diseases, like leading a healthy lifestyle, the inevitable deterioration associated with old age is the leading factor that make seniors vulnerable (Medicinenet, 2013).

Though these conditions may manifest alone as a single disease, the problem gets worse as these conditions overlap. According to recent studies, having one of these diseases may make an elderly patient more susceptible to contracting others. Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy, a psychiatry professor at Duke University, suggests that there is a link between dementia and vascular diseases. Studies aimed at establishing these connections are currently under way. As these ailments and conditions coexist, seniors suffer more and start to need more care. These overlapping health conditions also call for more specialized care for the senior; they need a caregiver or nurse who has experience working with patients suffering from similar comorbidities.

To date, more than 733,000 Americans live in assisted living facilities (ALFs) (New York Times, 2013). These popular living arraignments for seniors and people with disabilities offer an easy solution for their families if they can afford it. Depending on the preferred facility, level of care required, and professionals called for to provide care, yearly rates may vary, but the cost of living in a nursing home or assisted living facility has increased consistently for the past five years and typically costs about $80,000 annually. With such high costs, many families are looking for more affordable alternatives without sacrificing the quality of care and stability for their loved ones.

Many healthcare professionals, including Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs), are moving away from the old model of finding jobs in an established geriatric living facility. Uncertainty about the future of the healthcare industry has driven many qualified medical professionals to operate independently, working for private pay and visiting the patients in their homes. This limits the cost of care and allows aging loved ones to remain in their own homes.

The number of seniors who need personal care is ever increasing in the US. These individuals and their families have enough stress in their lives dealing with illnesses and deteriorating health, that the addition of navigating the waters of elderly care is simply too difficult to take on alone. Fortunately there are many resources available today that can help seniors and their loved ones find the care they need at a cost they can afford.

Well Beyond Care gives caregivers and those who need care the tools to manage their in-home care online. Caregivers, registered nurses, certified nurse assistants, and geriatric care managers can use the website to be best matched with Careseekers looking for care, set their wages, post their weekly availability, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Careseekers and family members looking for someone to give care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified nurses, CNAs and caregivers, are matched with a caregiver who can best can deliver care to specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules and payment online and receive personal support from the nurse that is assigned to them when they join. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.

Fear of Falling? Here is an Alternative

As people age, their ability to fall diminishes and as a result, may falls end in hospital stays, or even worse, fatality. Here is an innovated approach used by the Dutch in this New York Times’ Article.

Just as in the Netherlands, there has been an increase in the number of elderly in the US, so too is there an increase in the number of deaths caused by falls.  Experts indicate that this increase is due in part to people living longer, the types of medications uses, and a general lack of activity.   This would be a great program to be imported to the United States as well.

Tips for Caregivers: Caring for Elderly Parents with Alzheimer’s Disease

Caring for patients with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), resulting in dementia, can be a demanding experience due to their changing behavior. Every day brings new challenges and difficulties. A caregiver should have an effective plan in place to help them care for elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer’s.

Handling a person with dementia caused by onset Alzheimer’s disease or finding out that a loved one has Alzheimer’s disease can be stressful, challenging and frightening. Alzheimer disease is a progressive neurological disorder, affecting long and short-term memory, thinking skills, and human behavior. AD patients will forget how to perform basic daily tasks, but they also forget familiar people and places. Caring for a person with AD can become frustrating at times, but it is also extremely important because Alzheimer’s patients cannot usually care for themselves. Because our aging loved ones typically have such a hard time recognizing their surroundings, especially new ones, it is often recommended that patients stay living at home as long as possible rather than moving to a nursing home or assisted living facility.

Benefits of hiring your own Caregiver for elderly patients with Alzheimer’s

The benefit of hiring a caregiver directly is that you can select the person you like the best, has the appropriate dementia training, and who is the best fit for your family. Hiring someone directly is usually cheaper than hiring through an agency, and it is typically orders of magnitude less expensive than placing them in a nursing home.

The Internet makes it very easy to find an appropriately skilled caregiver near you. Using a fully integrated online service to hire a caregiver for your loved one is a new way to be matched with the best skilled caregivers, who are reliable, have a well-matched temperament, are verified, and affordable. Well Beyond Care makes hiring a caregiver simple and easy, allowing you to maintain control of your care needs or the care needs of a loved one.

Alzheimer’s Geriatric Patient Caregiver Tips

  • As a caregiver, it is vital to learn as much as possible about Alzheimer’s disease and what to expect from an elderly patient with Alzheimer’s, including taking as much training on AD and dementia as is available.
  • When possible, caregivers should learn about the elderly patient’s history and family. Surrounding the patient with items that remind them of their past or photographs or their loved ones may be beneficial to the patient.
  • A caregiver should not feel guilty if the patient is upset or confused. Always keep in mind that many behaviors associated with patient are due to the disease. Try to focus on their positive moments and good memories. Keeping a positive attitude will make helping the patient work through difficult times easier.
  • Engage the patient with games and books. Place more focus on having fun with the games rather than the patient’s illness. Entertain patients with interesting books to promote active listening.
  • Choose lively TV shows with simple story backgrounds to keep the patient occupied.
  • Play familiar music that the dementia patience likes to listen to. It has been shown that music is one of that memory functions to deteriorate with dementia.

About Well Beyond Care:

Well Beyond Care provides the tools that help you plan care and allow your loved ones to safely age in place.  It is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover.  Our platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. This solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.   Its online system combines the best in Caregiver matching (searching, screening, ratings & hiring) with all the back-office functions (time worked, payroll, scheduling, and notifications) to ensure safe, reliable, dependable, affordable care is obtained. It is the only company that gives each Careseeker access to their own local, personal nurse to help guide them through the hiring process. The Careseeker’s nurse provides advice on healthcare options and aids with transitional care.