Tag Archives: In Home Care

Hiring A Caregiver: Direct Hire Vs. Agency Hire

istock_000014488856xsmall-300x199If you or a loved one is considering hiring an in-home caregiver or private pay attendant to help take care of you at home, there are a lot of factors to consider. Many people choose to hire a caregiver through a private duty agency due to in part to the seemingly apparent ease of using one, but agencies tend to be very expensive. On top of having to pay your caregiver, you will have to pay fees for the agency’s services. In addition, you have little say on ‘what’ caregiver you get with an agency. On the other hand, hiring a caregiver completely on your own poses its own set of obstacles such as finding a trusted, qualified, reliable, quality caregiver.

What Is the Alternative?

Using a fully integrated online service to hire a caregiver for yourself or a loved one is a new and revolutionary way to find top-notch and well matched caregivers who are verified, qualified and more affordable than using an agency. Sites like WellBeyondCare.com, make hiring a caregiver simple and easy while allowing you to maintain control of your care needs.

When you use an agency, many elderly patients have trouble paying the agency fees, which can range from $10 to $25 per hour over what a caregiver is making. At the same time, private duty agencies will not always accept insurance or Medicare. Using an online resource, the individual who needs care is able to set their own price and still have the option of using Long Term Care Insurance or Medicare. This makes costs for the careseeker much lower and can relieve much of the stress of having to hire a private duty caregiver. WellBeyondCare.com also withholds taxes and provides the information you need to file reports when the time comes.

One other very important aspect of hiring a caregiver is ensuring that the person can be trusted and their work experience and references can be verified. Caregivers need to be reliable, show up on time, provide quality care and must be able to be trusted to perform the duties they say they can. A good online service will feature reviews and ratings for every caregiver who has worked for other care seekers provided by the careseekers themselves. They should also feature a system to get a background check and reference check, so you know the caregiver can be trusted coming to your home. This transparency gives careseekers and their family members peace of mind knowing that the caregiver they want to hire is dependable, reliable and meets their skill requirements.

With an easy-to-use website, helpful tools and personalized customer support, using an online resource such as WellBeyondCare.com to hire a caregiver is a new and great alternative to the old way of doing business. Save money and time by setting your own prices and managing all of your care needs from the comfort of your home.

WellBeyondCare.com gives caregivers and those who need care the tools to manage their in home care online. Caregivers, registered nurses and geriatric care managers can use the website to search for caregiving jobs, set their wages and weekly schedule, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Careseekers, or family members looking for someone to help care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified caregivers, post jobs that outline their specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules, and make payment online and receive personal support, local support from the WellBeyondCare team of Nurse Care-Pair Managers. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.

When are Patients “Unsafe” for Home Care?

Reprinted by permission from Elisabeth Hogue, Esq.; (877) 871-4062; ElizabethHogue@ElizabethHogue.net

CaringForCaregivers-CGS-largeDischarge planners/case managers are likely to encounter instances in which home care, hospice, and home medical equipment (HME) providers state that they cannot accept patients because they are “unsafe” at home. The use of this term may be confusing to discharge planners/case managers. What is it about patients’ homes that make it unsafe for them to receive services there? Aren’t all patients appropriate for home care?

First, discharge planners/case managers may not have provided services in non-institutional settings. If so, it may be difficult to make a crucial distinction between institutional care and home health services. Specifically, in institutional settings the provider controls the “turf” on which care is rendered. In post-acute care at home, providers have little control over the environment in which services are provided. In fact, patients have almost absolute control over the “turf” in home care because services are rendered in their private residences.

Consequently, home care providers often confront barriers to the provision of services that many discharge planners have not experienced. Staff have, for example, encountered “attack geese” when they arrive at patients’ homes and risk the consequences of a serious pecking in order to reach patients’ bedsides! Or they have come eyeball-to-eyeball with a pet alligator, named Bubba, in a mobile home in Louisiana!

Although patients may not be adversely affected by pecking geese and may have a cozy relationship with Bubba, there may be other factors over which home care providers have no control that clearly jeopardize the well-being or safety of patients. These factors may make it impossible for providers to render services at home. Patients’ homes may, for example, be in such disrepair that both patients and caregivers are at risk. A home health nurse, for example, recently fell through the floor of a patient’s home as she approached the patient’s bedside. Patients’ homes may also be invested with roaches, rodents and/or vermin of various types and descriptions. Despite appropriate interventions from providers, patients may suffer repeated falls at home that make it risky or unsafe for them to remain there.

Despite these examples, discharge planners/case managers may still be unclear about why patients cannot be cared for at home when post-acute providers decline referrals on the basis that patients are “unsafe.” It may be helpful for providers to be more detailed in their communications. Specifically, providers could say, “The patient’s home environment will not support services at home for the following reasons….” When providers’ communications with discharge planners/case managers are vague, discharge planners might prompt clearer communication by asking: “What are the specific reasons why this patient’s home environment will not support home care services?”

Institutional care and home care services are fundamentally different models of care. Because the differences are so great, it is reasonable to expect that providers who practice primarily in institutions and those who work in home care may not always understand or account for important factors involved in different types of care. Clear, specific communication is, therefore, absolutely essential for the well-being of patients.

Well Beyond Care:

WellBeyondCare.com gives those who need care the tools to manage their in home care online. Careseekers, or family members looking for someone to help care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified nurses and caregivers, post jobs that outline their specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules, and make payment online and receive personal support, local support from their personal Nurse Care-Pair Manager. Caregivers can use the website to search for caregiving jobs, set their wages, post their weekly availability, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.