Category Archives: Aging

Ready to Downsize? What to Look for in Your Next Home

The nest has been empty for some time, and as you get older you have to ask yourself if you are you ready to finally take the plunge on your senior downsize? Most older adults know they will have to disencumber and downsize eventually, but they often put it off since it is such a daunting task. However, moving sooner rather than later gives you the time and flexibility you need to find the right home and settle in.

This post explains what to look for when buying your downsized home and how you can make sure your next home is your “forever home” and one where you can age-in-place.

Finding the Right Home for Senior Living

For seniors, downsizing involves more than shrinking their square footage. When looking for a downsized home, seniors are also searching for a house that offers convenience and accessibility for senior living. That means features such as:

  • Proximity to shopping, healthcare, and public transportation.
  • A safe, walkable community.
  • Level covered parking.
  • No stairs, Single Story.
  • Wide doorways and hallways or an open floor plan.
  • No high-pile carpeting or slick tile floors.
  • Ample lighting, especially natural light.
  • Elevated kitchen and laundry appliances.
  • Two-level kitchen counters.
  • Roll-in showers.

It is hard to find a home that checks every box, so it is critical that older home buyers work with real estate agents who understand their needs and specializes in finding homes that are more appropriate for seniors or near-seniors. An agent who is certified as a Senior Real Estate Specialist (SRES) is the best choice, but if it is not possible to hire an SRES, interview agents to assess their experience working with senior home buyers.

Preparing Your New Home for Senior Living

The features listed above cover the priority items seniors need for the downsizing plans and in their home, but it is not everything that makes a house safe, secure, and age-friendly. Below are some common changes seniors need to make when moving to a new home.

Accessibility Upgrades

Your goal when buying a home is to avoid properties that need major remodeling, but that does not mean you can escape all home improvements. There are a lot of little changes that improve a senior’s comfort, convenience, and safety at home, with a total remodel such as:

  • Replacing traditional light switches with rocker switches.
  • Replacing door and cabinet knobs with levers and pulls.
  • Installing grab bars in bathrooms (showers / toilets).
  • Installing task lighting / motion lighting
  • Building a parcel bench near the main entrance.
  • Automating home functions like lights and locks with smart technology.

Depending on your health and/or skill level, you may want to complete these improvements before moving in or budget for them one at a time. If you want to tackle renovations before move-in but your home is already sold, book a vacation rental for a short-term housing solution. You can even rent a property near activities you would enjoy and make a “mini staycation” out of it. As Turnkey reminds, Austin (and most cities), have plenty to keep you busy, from the area’s many gorgeous lakes to sporting events at the University of Texas to great restaurants to scenic walkways. What you do is totally up to you.

Landscaping

Time outdoors is great for seniors’ well-being, but most older adults are not up for the routine task of maintaining a lawn and garden. That is not a problem if you are considering an assisted living facility or 55-plus community where the grounds are maintained by staff. However, if have decided to purchase a home, you will most likely want to budget and hire a landscape designer to create an accessible outdoor space where you can sit, stroll, and even garden in raised beds. If you are working with a sloped lawn, consider grading it to improve accessibility. In Austin, you costs run between $1,157 and $2,837 depending on the size and scope of the project.

In-Home Care

Aging-in-place seniors may still need an extra hand at home. Even if you are getting along fine today, you may need assistance with housekeeping or home healthcare in the future. Start thinking about how you pay for the care you need so you’re prepared when the time comes. Depending on your needs, in-home care could cost $150 per day / $750 per week if you decide to you a private duty agency, as their average rate is $27 per hour with usually a 4 hour minimum. If you decide to hire a caregiver yourself and use a service like Well Beyond Care, with no minimums, you could reduce your daily / weekly spend to $30 per and $100 per week. Saving from $10,000 to $30,000 per year in care costs.

The decision to downsize is never an easy one, but for most seniors, it usually the right one. In a smaller, more accessible home, you can enjoy your senior years without being burdened by upkeep or a home you do not feel safe living in. Downsizing can be a lengthy process, however. Between searching for the right home, renovating to make it move-in ready, and packing up the old house, a senior’s downsizing may take a year or more from start to finish. Rather than putting it off, start taking the first steps toward your senior downsize today.

There are more and more companies and individuals out there to to help seniros and families with downsizing. These companies offer plans and checklists to ease the transition from one home to another. Companies like Downsize My Home, offer advice and guidance, as well as resources to make the process of downsizing as smooth and pain-free as possible.
Image via Unsplash

About the Author
Mike Longsdon provides advice to seniors on downsizing and aging in place as a contributor to Elder Freedom.  He is also an expert on topics like tackling home accessibility modifications, how to find a great contractor, and the benefits of aging in place to name a few.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

The Healthy Senior’s Guide to Foot Care (Infographic)

As we age, maintaining good foot health is vital to our well being, comfort and mobility.

For many people aged over 65, keeping up good foot health can be a challenge and one quarter of all seniors are affected by foot pain. Fortunately, many foot ailments are entirely avoidable by taking a few simple precautions. If you are aged 65+ and are interested in discovering more about foot care, we recommend that you read this helpful infographic provided by Walsh Brothers Shoes which lays out some of the most effective ways to keep your feet healthy and happy as we age.

Maintaining good foot hygiene will help keep foot problems at bay and may even cause some of them disappear altogether. Keep feet fresh by wearing clean, dry socks everyday and by switching up your footwear. Wash your feet thoroughly a few times a week and take extra care to dry and moisturize regularly.

Exercise is one of the best ways to maintain good foot health. However, if your feet are hurting chances are the prospect of physical activity does not seem appealing. It is worth bearing in mind that with reduced exercise comes loss of muscle mass and strength; reduced endurance; and higher risk of diseases related to a sedentary lifestyle. Walking is best way to exercise your feet, but if you cannot go outside, there are also many simple stretches that you can try at home.

As we get older, it becomes increasingly important to pay attention to our feet as they can indicate a wide range of ailments. Check your feet frequently and arrange to see a doctor or foot specialist if you notice anything out of the ordinary.

Take a look at this infographic to learn more about foot health and care for senior citizens.  Here is to you good health.

Signs Your Loved One Needs Care

As individuals age, many of the things they used to do with ease sometimes become much more difficult to do.  Acknowledging the need for help and then accepting assistance is not easy for individuals as they get older. Often, the decision and responsibility falls on Aging Motherone or more family members to recognize the signs that your loved one might need support and aide in completing the activities of daily living. Many of these include simple tasks such as bathing, dressing, and cooking.

So, how do you know if it is time for in-home care for your loved one? There are some obvious signs that could signal a red flag that are listed below.  One may not be enough, but when these come in combination you should seriously look to have a caregiver aide in the home.

Reduction in Physical Abilities and/or Mental Status

  • Difficulty keeping track of time / forgetting appointments
  • Sleeping for most of the day / not waking properly
  • Poor diet or weight loss
  • Rapid weight gain
  • Loss of interest in hobbies, activities or in socializing
  • Uncertainty and confusion when performing once-familiar tasks
  • Changes in mood or extreme mood swings
  • Difficulty getting up from a seated position
  • Difficulty with walking, balance and mobility
  • Unexplained bruising or injuries from falls or hitting furniture
  • Forgetfulness, including forgetting to take medications or taking incorrect dosages
  • Consistent use of poor judgment (e.g. falling for scams or sales pitches, giving away money)

Deterioration in Personal Hygiene

  • Unpleasant body odor due to infrequent showering or bathing
  • A smell of urine in the house or on clothing
  • Noticeable decline in grooming habits and personal care (e.g. unkempt hair, untrimmed nails, lack of oral care, wearing dirty or stained clothing)

Neglecting Household Responsibilities and Upkeep

  • Inability to independently complete Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)
  • Little or no fresh, healthy food in the fridge
  • Unkept, uncleaned house and/or extreme clutter
  • Unwashed laundry piling up
  • Stains or wet spots on furniture or carpet
  • Spoiled or outdated food that does not get thrown away
  • Stacks of unopened mail or an overflowing mailbox
  • Late payment notices, bounced checks and calls from bill collectors
  • Utilities being turned off due to missed payments

Hiring a Caregiver or Caregiving Service
If many of these indicators are present, it does not mean you have to place mom or dad into an assisted living or a nursing home facility. These are often very expensive and may not be the right choice.  However, these red flags do indicate that some form of daily supportive care is needed. You may have to consider hiring a private duty care agency, or as a much more affordable alternative, hire your own caregiver using a service such as Well Beyond Care.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

Private Duty Services for All!

Reprinted by permission from Elisabeth Hogue, Esq.; (877) 871-4062; ElizabethHogue@ElizabethHogue.net

In order to be appropriate for home care services of all types, patients must be able to care for themselves or have primary caregivers who can meet patients’ needs in between visits from professional staff from home care providers. This requirement is necessary in order to meet the eligibility of many payors, to avoid risk of legal liability and to help ensure quality of care.

Patients’ family members or others may be willing to serve as primary caregivers on a voluntary basis. If not, providers should offer patients and/or their family members the option to pay privately for primary caregivers. These services may be referred to as private duty or non-medical services.

The option to pay for private duty home care services should be offered to all patients who cannot care for themselves and who have no voluntary primary caregivers. Patients who can care for themselves or have voluntary primary caregivers may also wish to contract for additional assistance, so providers should offer this option to all patients who may benefit from these services.

Specifically, this means that:

  • Hospital discharge planners/case managers should offer private duty services to all patients who may benefit from them and assist patients to arrange for such services post-discharge as part of the discharge planning process.
  • Other types of institutional providers; such as skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), Long Term Acute Care Hospitals (LTACHs), and independent rehabilitation facilities (IRFs); should also offer patients who are being discharged the option to arrange for assistance from private duty agencies and should arrange for such services post-discharge.
  • Assisted living facilities (ALFs) should offer private duty services to all of their patients who may benefit from such services.
  • Home health agencies should offer patients the option to private pay for services if primary caregivers are no longer available to provide assistance and if patients no longer meet the eligibility requirements of payor sources.
  • Home health agencies, hospices and home medical equipment (HME) companies should educate patients about private duty services even though patients may have voluntary caregivers and help patients and their families arrange for these services.

Providers may be reluctant to offer these services to patients and their families because of their cost. They may also erroneously conclude that patients and their families cannot afford them. Providers should not jump to conclusions about who can afford these services. Instead, private duty home care services should be offered to all patients and their family members who may benefit from them.

A home health agency, for example, decided that a patient no longer met the eligibility requirements of the Medicare Program. The staff of the agency was reluctant to offer the patient the option to private pay for additional services prior to discharge because the patient lived in a “shack” and drove an old, beat-up truck. They did so anyway. To the staff’s surprise, upon receipt of the offer, the patient got out of bed, extracted a wad of cash from under the mattress and told the staff that there was plenty more money to pay for private duty services!

Private duty care has a very important role to play in the provision of home care services. This type of care should be offered to all patients whenever it seems that patients may benefit from it.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, Well Beyond Care. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

 

Sandwich Generation Woes

A funny thing has happened in the United State over the past 50 years, which on the surface is good, but for a growing segment of the population is adding an additional stress in their life. Due in a large part to vast improvements in medicines and treatment, the median life expectancy has been steadily increasing, adding about one half year of life expectancy to the population ever two years. So, in 1959 the median life expectancy was under 70, now, it is 83.  At the same time, Americans on average have been holding offer getting married and starting a family well into the late twenties or early thirties.  As a result, the generational gap between grandparents and grandkids has grown from 20 years to now 30.

Elder care services are becoming an ever-increasing need as baby boomers continue to retire at an alarming rate. Combining the fact that the elderly are living longer, and individuals are holding off having children until they are older, a new dilemma has developed for individuals between 38 and 55. Many of these adults are becoming part of the what is referred to the “sandwich” generation. This is where an adult has to not only take care of their children, but one, two, three or even four parents dispersed across the country which they are also taking care of.

Accounting to a 2013 Pew Research report, nearly half (47%) of adults in their 40s and 50s have a parent age 65 or older and are either raising a young child or financially supporting a grown child (age 18 or older). And about one-in-seven middle-aged adults (15%) are providing financial support to both an aging parent and a child.  Combine the fact that most adults in America do not live within 100 miles of their aging parents, it becomes obvious that this trend is adding stress to when elderly parents get ill or need care.

As a fallout of this growing trend, when the parents of a working adult become ill or need assistance, presently that working adult child will need to leave and take extended time away from work to deal with the situation.  The average time away is one week, and sometimes stretches into three weeks! In most cases, these individuals will likely have to continue to visit their aging parents for extended periods of time for the next 5 to 15 years.

The reason why individuals have to take time off, is that up until now, there was no “on-line” way to get reliable geriatric care. As stated earlier, most adult children do not reside close to their aging parents, and as such, have to schedule time to travel in order to arraign for care from a private duty agency, which includes interviewing the agencies, developing a care plan, and signing contracts.

Not only is there an impact on work, there is also a financial impact on these adults. According to a recent AARP study, 30 percent of family caregivers dip into their personal savings to cover long-term care costs, 16 percent reduce contributions to their retirement accounts, and about half cut back on leisure spending in order to help take care of their parents.

The tough reality is that many families are not rich enough to afford the staggering cost of private duty long-term care. Yet at the same time, they do not qualify for Medicaid, a health care program for low-income and disabled adults. So, it is nice to have a lower cost alternative to the high priced private duty agencies, that also delivers a superior service like Well Beyond Care.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com. The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

 

Think you will never be a Caregiver? Ask your parents

Our aging parents sometimes have unmet expectations of their children, like wanting them to become doctors, or visiting and corresponding more, and in an ever growing situations, taking care of them in old age.

But when the need for our aging parents to get care and their adult children are not around, this can be disastrous for all parties, both emotionally and financially.  Many times, adult children are still taking care of their own kids, and their parents are left with no one to help them around the house or bring them to doctors. This “sandwich generation” is when adult children are taking care of both their children and their parents. In more and more cases, adult children are saving less for their futures as they help pay for their parents’ care and, in a few scenarios, may cut back on work hours or leave a job altogether.  In the worse case scenario,  discussions about what to do with mom or dad when they need care now or in the future go  undiscussed until it is too late.  Way too often, aging parents just assume that their adult children will take care of them and their needs, often thinking that one will move in with then in their twilight years.

According to a survey conducted by Bay Alarm Medical, more than 55% of parents anticipate their children will be the ones caring for them, either physically or financially, as they age. Unfortunately, most adult children do not agreed with that notion, or know that this is what their parents are thinking. In some areas, like the Midwest, only 36% of people felt children were obligated to care for their aging parents. Participants in other regions of the U.S. were much more likely to say they felt an obligation to caring for their parents in their old age. Parents are three and a half times more likely to lean on their daughters (and expect that of them) than their sons.  According to a 2006 study on mothers’ expectations of caregiving by their children,  and usually rely on the children they feel are closest emotionally.  To counter that finding, at Well Beyond Care, we have found that 80% of the adult children using our service as the care administrator and paying for the service, are male.

Unfortunately, most families do not discuss caregiving needs, nor most money topics in genreal, because they are so uncomfortable, personal or private. Not only do our aging parents keep their finances hidden, but they sometimes forget or avoid, or just don’t know how, to tell their children what they expect in their old age. The consequences could be a disappointed parent, or one without the proper plan to fund their care, or even worse, a parent who needs care and can not get it.

To the consternation of  adult children, they end up bearing the brunt financially if they become their parents’ caregiver without planning. The children may not pursue the careers they want because they have to move back home, or they forego putting more money into a retirement account because they think they willl need liquidity for when their parents fall ill.

Communication is vital between the generations in terms of caregiving, estate planning and myriad other reasons and goes a long way to help both generations plan and live without regrets.  Begin by getting the entire family together (or at least those most important to planning) and come up with a list of questions or concerns, such as who will provide physical care, do household chores or pay bills. Because this is such an emotionally charged subject (people don’t normally like talking about their declining physical or mental state), children have to be especially patient and empathetic toward their parents, and give them room to get angry when they bring up difficult observations, such as impaired driving abilities. If parents keep resisting the conversation, be persistent and bring it up as many times as necessary.

The good news is this that most adult children tend to step up to the plate, even if it is a stressful situation. Of all the 2,000 adult children surveyed in a Merrill Lynch and Age Wave report, 100% said they support their loved ones emotionally and socially, followed by 92% said they provide household support, 84% who said medical support and 64% who said physical care. Another 92% said they provide financial assistance, such as paying the bills, handling insurance claims and cutting back on their own expenses or dipping into their own savings accounts. What is beneficial, is that if a family is unable to move back home, Well Beyond Care can supply a service that saves on average $10,000 to $30,000 over private duty care, and allows management of the care plan from anywhere in the world.

About Well Beyond Care
Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com.  The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

 

Common Diseases Seniors Face and Challenges in Providing Healthcare Solutions

Due to aging, diet, and living styles, seniors are more prone to degenerative diseases. As people age they become more susceptible to diseases and conditions that make even simple tasks difficult. Routine activities like grocery shopping, preparing meals and running errands become harder as we get older and adopt a sedentary lifestyle, which is why many elderly people seek assistance from caregivers. Though aging is a reality of life, it is important to know which specific diseases are most common among seniors in order to decide a course of action of prevention, and barring that, then which type of care or assistance is best for your needs.

According to a recent article in the New York Times, the most common diseases among seniors in the U.S. are Alzheimer’s or any other form of dementia, high blood pressure, heart disease, depression, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Each of these illnesses can have dramatic effects on the quality of life of seniors and their families. Caring for an aging parent with dementia or depression can be especially trying. And while there are some precautions one can take to avoid such diseases, like leading a healthy lifestyle, the inevitable deterioration associated with old age is the leading factor that make seniors vulnerable (Medicinenet, 2013).

Though these conditions may manifest alone as a single disease, the problem gets worse as these conditions overlap. According to recent studies, having one of these diseases may make an elderly patient more susceptible to contracting others. Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy, a psychiatry professor at Duke University, suggests that there is a link between dementia and vascular diseases. Studies aimed at establishing these connections are currently under way. As these ailments and conditions coexist, seniors suffer more and start to need more care. These overlapping health conditions also call for more specialized care for the senior; they need a caregiver or nurse who has experience working with patients suffering from similar comorbidities.

To date, more than 733,000 Americans live in assisted living facilities (ALFs) (New York Times, 2013). These popular living arraignments for seniors and people with disabilities offer an easy solution for their families if they can afford it. Depending on the preferred facility, level of care required, and professionals called for to provide care, yearly rates may vary, but the cost of living in a nursing home or assisted living facility has increased consistently for the past five years and typically costs about $80,000 annually. With such high costs, many families are looking for more affordable alternatives without sacrificing the quality of care and stability for their loved ones.

Many healthcare professionals, including Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs), are moving away from the old model of finding jobs in an established geriatric living facility. Uncertainty about the future of the healthcare industry has driven many qualified medical professionals to operate independently, working for private pay and visiting the patients in their homes. This limits the cost of care and allows aging loved ones to remain in their own homes.

The number of seniors who need personal care is ever increasing in the US. These individuals and their families have enough stress in their lives dealing with illnesses and deteriorating health, that the addition of navigating the waters of elderly care is simply too difficult to take on alone. Fortunately there are many resources available today that can help seniors and their loved ones find the care they need at a cost they can afford.

Well Beyond Care gives caregivers and those who need care the tools to manage their in-home care online. Caregivers, registered nurses, certified nurse assistants, and geriatric care managers can use the website to be best matched with Careseekers looking for care, set their wages, post their weekly availability, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Careseekers and family members looking for someone to give care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified nurses, CNAs and caregivers, are matched with a caregiver who can best can deliver care to specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules and payment online and receive personal support from the nurse that is assigned to them when they join. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.

Study Shows, Wearables Do Not Improve Outcomes

While we are a big believer that technology is a great boon to health care and in improving outcomes, and healthcare in general, we have always had our doubts on the efficacy on wearables in truly improving outcomes, or caregiving in any measurable way. Now a new study conducted by Cedars-Sinai investigators published in Nature Partner Journal, NPJ Digital Medicine indicates that these very expensive wearables have essentially no effect on improving medical outcomes.

As outlined in Health Management Technology’s article, “Analysis shows lack of evidence that wearable biosensors improve patient outcome,” over the past ten years, there has been no significant improvement in patient outcomes with or without wearable. Well Beyond Care has always believed that while technology is wonderful, but without a competent and dedicated caregiver, that any improvement in tech is pretty much useless. The trick is in integrating technology to improve excellent and dedicated caregiving.

Fear of Falling? Here is an Alternative

As people age, their ability to fall diminishes and as a result, may falls end in hospital stays, or even worse, fatality. Here is an innovated approach used by the Dutch in this New York Times’ Article.

Just as in the Netherlands, there has been an increase in the number of elderly in the US, so too is there an increase in the number of deaths caused by falls.  Experts indicate that this increase is due in part to people living longer, the types of medications uses, and a general lack of activity.   This would be a great program to be imported to the United States as well.

Tips for Finding Care for Elderly Individuals

As we grow older, we go through many changes both physically and mentally. Some elderly individuals will have trouble performing every day tasks, like preparing their own meals or dressing themselves, while others will retain more independence. There are cases where aging loved ones who are still mobile and alert may need occasional assistance and care. The type of care that an individual receives will depend on their specific care needs and their family’s budget.

The cost of healthcare in the US, and more specifically in Texas, California, and Florida has been steadily increasing over the years. More and more families are struggling to afford nursing home care or assisted living facility care for their aging relatives.

According to Genworth’s 2016 Cost of Care Survey, the average cost of private nursing home care in the US is now $92,345 per year (or $235 per day). Just eight years ago that average was $67,527 per year. Though some geriatric patients may prefer the live-in nursing home option, the prohibitively high cost makes it impossible for many families to afford this option. Hence, many families are now opting to hire a private, qualified in-home caregiver or nurse to take care of their parents or loved ones in the comfort of their own home.

Some individuals worry that the lower price of an in-home caregiver means inferior quality care, but this is not necessarily the case. Many caregivers and nurses choose to work independently in order to maximize their income and to be able to control their schedule. While many caregivers are very capable and trustworthy, to be sure you are hiring a quality caregiver any person looking for in home care should follow these steps:

  • Use a trusted resource to find your caregiver or nurse. If you are hiring a caregiver for a parent or friend there are many online resources available that make this process easier than what was capable in the past.
  • Look for caregivers with recommendations or reviews from other patients. This will give you an idea of how well they got on with other geriatric individuals.
  • Only interview caregivers whose qualifications meet your or your parents’ needs. If your parent suffers from respiratory problems, look for a caregiver who is also a respiratory therapist.
  • Be thorough in your interview. This caregiver is someone you want to build a meaningful and positive relationship with, so make sure you get to know them and feel comfortable with them.
  • Get a certified background check and verify their references. This is an essential step in ensuring your parents’ safety and reducing your own stress.

There are a number of caregivers and skilled nurses available to provide in-home elderly care for you or your loved ones. If you are looking for a trusted resource to help you find professional caregivers and nurses, check out websites such as WellBeyondCare.com to find elderly care professionals in your area.

Well Beyond Care provides the tools that help you plan care and allow your loved ones to safely age in place. It is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover. Our platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. This solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs. Its online system combines the best in Caregiver matching (searching, screening, ratings & hiring) with all the back-office functions (time worked, payroll, scheduling, and notifications) to ensure safe, reliable, dependable, affordable care is obtained. It is the only company that gives each Careseeker access to their own local, personal nurse to help guide them through the hiring process. The Careseeker’s nurse provides advice on healthcare options and aids with transitional care.