All posts by Well Beyond Care

Well Beyond Care Selected as Innovation Hub Finalist

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Lauren Tarrant, RN
COO/CNO
Well Beyond Care, Inc.
(512) 809-4057
lauren@wellbeyondcare.com

Well Beyond Care selected as HFMA Innovation Hub Finalist

Well Beyond Care has been chosen to present at Health Financial Management Association’s Annual Event as part of the Innovation Hub Pitch Event

Austin, TX, Jun 12, 2018 – Well Beyond Care has been selected by the Healthcare Financial Management Association (hfma.org) as one of the top 12 startups that can most influence the healthcare industry out a pool of over 100 candidate companies that submitted their ideas to a nationwide contest.  As a finalist, the Company has been invited to attend the annual HFMA meeting (annual.hfma.org) as a spotlight company in this year’s Innovation Hub and take part in the Virtual Pitch Competition.  The annual meeting is taking place in Las Vegas, Nevada, from June 24th through June 27th.   Well Beyond Care was selected due in part to the way the Company can impact 4 out of the 8 most critical content areas (see graphic below) outline in this year’s mission, including Reducing Total Cost of Care, Creating a Consumer Centric Healthcare Delivery System, improvement to Payment Trends and Models, and leveraging and capturing Trends and Innovation.

Part of the criteria of being selected was how well a company would affect at least one of the following outcomes.

  • Reducing Cost of Care Delivery: Product, service or technology that quantifiably reduces the cost of care delivery through its implementation or utilization.
  • Enhancing the Healthcare Consumer Experience: Product, service, or technology focused on specifically improving the healthcare consumer experience in facets such as patient satisfaction, care coordination, price transparency, communication, etc.
  • Improving Population Health Management through Analytics: Product, service or technology providing analytics that lead to better health and outcomes of patients. Areas and products in the realm of wearables, mobile or telehealth, monitoring, or other digital tools.

As the Company’s CEO, Jeffrey Fry goes on to say, “Part of what makes this a great selection for our company, is being recognized for how we can save families and hospital systems money by reducing readmissions, how we combine high tech with high touch using our nurse navigators, and ultimately we will allow people to age safely in their homes and prevent a large number of emergent events. It is always nice to be recognized for your efforts, but more so by the individuals who are responsible for cost containment while maintaining quality control.”

Presently, Well Beyond Care is operating in 44 States and territories and has clients in over 350 cities. The company did its “hard-launch” in the first quarter of 2018 and is looking to hire upwards of 500 nurses this year as it continues to expand its footprint across the United Stares.  The company is also starting to partner with not-for-profit and public hospitals in order to reduce readmissions and improve outcomes.

About HFMA

With more than 38,000 members, the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) is the nation’s premier membership organization for healthcare finance leaders. HFMA builds and supports coalitions with other healthcare associations and industry groups to achieve consensus on solutions for the challenges the U.S. healthcare system faces today. Working with a broad cross-section of stakeholders, HFMA identifies gaps throughout the healthcare delivery system and bridges them through the establishment and sharing of knowledge and best practices. We help healthcare stakeholders achieve optimal results by creating and providing education, analysis, and practical tools and solutions. Our mission is to lead the financial management of health care.

About Well Beyond Care

Well Beyond Care is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover through the web application, WellBeyondCare.com.  The Company’s platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. Their solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs.

The difference between a Registered Nurse (RN) and a Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN)

Although registered nurses (RNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) both practice in the health care industry, there are a number of distinctions that set one apart from the other. While these medical professionals may have some similarities, their differences in terms of education and training, skills, responsibilities, and expected salaries draw clear lines between the two.

To start with, being a Registered Nurse requires having a diploma after successfully completing a nursing program, receiving an Associate’s degree, or a Bachelor’s of Science degree in nursing.  A nursing program diploma under an Associate’s degree program usually only takes two years, while a Bachelor’s degree program requires a four-year commitment.

After formal education, a nursing graduate must pass the National Council Licensure Examination and other statutory requirements as mandated by State law to become an RN. On the other hand, being a Licensed Vocational Nurse requires only the completion of a certificate program at a community college or career center. This education takes only a year, covering the subjects of nursing, pharmacology, and biology.   Both RN and LVN programs include supervised clinical experience in hospital departments such as pediatrics, psychiatry, maternity, and surgery. Bachelor degree programs usually include more training in the physical and social sciences, communication, leadership, and critical thinking, which is becoming more important as nursing practice becomes more complex.

LVNs possess the necessary skills to provide care and assistance to patients in a wide variety of clinical settings. They may be employed in different environments such as medical clinics, schools, and even as home care providers. They offer assistance ranging from the administration of oral medicine, dressing wounds, to personal hygienic routines. Depending on their relevant other skills, training, and experience; LVNs may pursue voluntary certification in additional skills such as in gerontology, foot care, or IV therapy. While LVNs possess general knowledge and skills to provide care and assistance to patients, RNs have more specialized skills and knowledge in the same areas of practice. RNs may perform diagnostic tests and analysis, and educate patients and their families on managing illnesses as well as operating medical equipment.

Responsibilities of an LVN may be considered more intricate, though less demanding and delicate than those of the RNs. LVNs are expected to provide bedside care, including bathing and dressing, and assistance with other daily tasks as required. RNs, on the other hand, may assist in the administration of anesthetics, IV medications, and other more specialized health care needs.

Think you will never be a Caregiver? Ask your parents

Our aging parents sometimes have unmet expectations of their children, like wanting them to become doctors, or visiting and corresponding more, and in an ever growing situations, taking care of them in old age.

But when the need for our aging parents to get care and their adult children are not around, this can be disastrous for all parties, both emotionally and financially.  Many times, adult children are still taking care of their own kids, and their parents are left with no one to help them around the house or bring them to doctors. This “sandwich generation” is when adult children are taking care of both their children and their parents. In more and more cases, adult children are saving less for their futures as they help pay for their parents’ care and, in a few scenarios, may cut back on work hours or leave a job altogether.  In the worse case scenario,  discussions about what to do with mom or dad when they need care now or in the future go  undiscussed until it is too late.  Way too often, aging parents just assume that their adult children will take care of them and their needs, often thinking that one will move in with then in their twilight years.

According to a survey conducted by Bay Alarm Medical, more than 55% of parents anticipate their children will be the ones caring for them, either physically or financially, as they age. Unfortunately, most adult children do not agreed with that notion, or know that this is what their parents are thinking. In some areas, like the Midwest, only 36% of people felt children were obligated to care for their aging parents. Participants in other regions of the U.S. were much more likely to say they felt an obligation to caring for their parents in their old age. Parents are three and a half times more likely to lean on their daughters (and expect that of them) than their sons.  According to a 2006 study on mothers’ expectations of caregiving by their children,  and usually rely on the children they feel are closest emotionally.  To counter that finding, at Well Beyond Care, we have found that 80% of the adult children using our service as the care administrator and paying for the service, are male.

Unfortunately, most families do not discuss caregiving needs, nor most money topics in genreal, because they are so uncomfortable, personal or private. Not only do our aging parents keep their finances hidden, but they sometimes forget or avoid, or just don’t know how, to tell their children what they expect in their old age. The consequences could be a disappointed parent, or one without the proper plan to fund their care, or even worse, a parent who needs care and can not get it.

To the consternation of  adult children, they end up bearing the brunt financially if they become their parents’ caregiver without planning. The children may not pursue the careers they want because they have to move back home, or they forego putting more money into a retirement account because they think they willl need liquidity for when their parents fall ill.

Communication is vital between the generations in terms of caregiving, estate planning and myriad other reasons and goes a long way to help both generations plan and live without regrets.  Begin by getting the entire family together (or at least those most important to planning) and come up with a list of questions or concerns, such as who will provide physical care, do household chores or pay bills. Because this is such an emotionally charged subject (people don’t normally like talking about their declining physical or mental state), children have to be especially patient and empathetic toward their parents, and give them room to get angry when they bring up difficult observations, such as impaired driving abilities. If parents keep resisting the conversation, be persistent and bring it up as many times as necessary.

The good news is this that most adult children tend to step up to the plate, even if it is a stressful situation. Of all the 2,000 adult children surveyed in a Merrill Lynch and Age Wave report, 100% said they support their loved ones emotionally and socially, followed by 92% said they provide household support, 84% who said medical support and 64% who said physical care. Another 92% said they provide financial assistance, such as paying the bills, handling insurance claims and cutting back on their own expenses or dipping into their own savings accounts. What is beneficial, is that if a family is unable to move back home, Well Beyond Care can supply a service that saves on average $10,000 to $30,000 over private duty care, and allows management of the care plan from anywhere in the world.

Well Beyond Care:

WellBeyondCare.com gives those who need care the tools to manage their in home care online. Careseekers, or family members looking for someone to help care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified nurses and caregivers, post jobs that outline their specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules, and make payment online and receive personal support, local support from their personal Nurse Care-Pair Manager. Caregivers can use the website to search for caregiving jobs, set their wages, post their weekly availability, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.

CMS Adds Non-Skilled In-Home Care to Medicare Advantage Benefit

Beginning in 2019, non-skilled in-home care services will be allowed as a supplemental benefit for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced in a final rule issued Monday, April 8th. This ruling, originally proposed in February, was met with enthusiasm from both the home health and private duty home care industries.

This marks the first time CMS has allowed supplemental benefits that include daily maintenance in Medicare Advantage. “CMS is expanding the definition of ‘primarily health related,’”the agency stated in its announcement. “Under the new definition, the agency will allow supplemental benefits if they compensate for physical impairments, diminish the impact of injuries or health conditions, and/or reduce avoidable emergency room utilization.”

In 2015, 35% of Medicare beneficiaries were participants in MA, according to CMS data. And that figure is expected to grow quickly over the next several years. Home care providers are not the only ones welcoming this change, as many also believe MA payors are ready and willing to pay for non-skilled in-home care services but as of yet did not have a mechanism to do so.

“The Medicare Advantage plans have a very different payment environment [than fee-for-service],” Tracy Moorehead, CEO of industry group ElevatingHome, told Home Health Care News at the association’s National Leadership Conference in March. “They have greater flexibility than the fee-for-service providers do. They do not have a home bound requirement in many cases. So they are tasked with full capitation, where they have an amount they are provided [with] to care for a patient and they will do whatever they need to make sure that patient doesn’t cost them more money than necessary. And if that [includes] private duty services, then I’m sure a plan is more than ready to pay for that.”

In fact, insurers and payors have been positioning themselves to better align with post-acute care services for years. As the focus also shifts toward the high-cost, high-needs dual-eligible patient populations of people who qualify for both Medicare and Medicaid, that has provided additional incentive to cover personal care services as well.

“What Humana, UnitedHealthcare, and Aetna have been saying for several years is that we’ve have a great relationship for skilled home health and hospice for quite a while,” Keith Myers, CEO of LHC Group (Nasdaq: LHCG), told HHCN. “In the last few years, they’re starting to focus more on dual-eligible population and have needed us to have a bigger commitment in personal services.”

Well Beyond Care at SXSW

South by Southwest, or South By, or SXSW is an annual Austin, Texas event that highlights music, technology, film, and more and more healthcare. This year’s event happened between March 8th and the 17th. Well Beyond Care shared a booth as part of SXSW’s Health + MedTech Pavilion from March 10th – 13th in Austin Convention Center with 24HourPhysicians, and got a lot of traffic. Also, our CEO, Jeffrey Fry, was interviewed by Erik Liekam of KLBJ out of Austin, TX. You can listen to each below, they are only 37 seconds long.

Here are some of the pictures of the craziness that is SX.

Hospital Discharge Planners and Recommendations of Post-Acute Providers

Reprinted by permission from Elisabeth Hogue, Esq.; (877) 871-4062; ElizabethHogue@ElizabethHogue.net

MedPAC advises Congress about Medicare. The Remington Report in the October 4, 2017, edition of FutureFocus reported that a MedPAC staff member stated as follows at MedPAC’s September, 2017, meeting:

“The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) requires hospitals to provide beneficiaries with a list of nearby SNFs and home health agencies but the list is not required to have quality information….Medicare statute provides beneficiaries with the freedom to choose their PAC provider, the law states that hospitals may not recommend providers (emphasis added).”

Then in the March 7, 2018, edition of FutureForcus, a link was provided to a power point presentation presented by MedPAC on March 1, 2018. A slide entitled “Discharge planning is a hospital responsibility” that was included in the presentation states as follows:

“…Hospital discharge planners may not recommend specific providers-beneficiaries have freedom to choose PAC providers.”

Is it true that hospital discharge planners are prohibited from recommending post-acute providers to patients based on applicable federal requirements? The answer is a resounding NO!

The basis for the remarks of members of the staff at MedPAC seems to be Conditions of Participation (CoPs) of the Medicare Program that establish requirements for hospital discharge planning. Specifically, 42 CFR 482.43(7) says that hospitals must not specify or otherwise limit the qualified providers that are available to patients.

But making recommendations to patients about post-acute providers while emphasizing patients’ right to choose providers does not necessarily entail “specifying” or “otherwise limiting” the providers available to patients. In fact, such discussions seem to be required by applicable national standards of care the Case Management Society of America and sanctioned by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Prohibiting these types of discussions also has practical implications for patients and their families.

Specifically, the Case Management Society of America (CMSA) first published Standards governing the practice of case management, including hospital discharge planners/case managers, in 1995. The Standards were revised in 2002, 2010 and 2016. Among other requirements, these standards require case managers to advocate on behalf of patients, including provision of assistance with making decisions about their care.

In addition, CMS sanctioned making recommendations to patients through the use of preferred providers. In final regulations of the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services at 80 Fed. Reg. 73274 (November 24, 2015), CMS says on Page 73518: “We agree that hospitals should be allowed to identify preferred providers and suppliers…”

CMS goes on to say on Page 73520 that:

“…hospitals, if desired, may recommend “preferred providers,” that is, high quality PAC providers/suppliers with whom they have relationships (either financial and/or clinical) for the purposes of improving quality, efficiency, or continuity of care.”

Finally, anecdotally, hospital discharge planners/case managers often report that patients are unable to choose post-acute providers when lists are presented to them. In light of MedPAC’s comments above, it sounds like discharge planners/case managers are unable to provide assistance to patients except perhaps to hand them the equivalent of a copy of the yellow pages! From a practical point of view, this dog will not hunt! In fact, the “heart” of the discharge planning process includes recommendations from discharge planners/case managers about the best choices for patients. Patients are, of course, free to reject these recommendations.

Case management/discharge planning activities are at the heart of our healthcare delivery system. These crucial activities are finally receiving the recognition and “due” that they deserve. They should not be mischaracterized!

Well Beyond Care:

WellBeyondCare.com gives those who need care the tools to manage their in home care online. Careseekers, or family members looking for someone to help care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified nurses and caregivers, post jobs that outline their specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules, and make payment online and receive personal support, local support from their personal Nurse Care-Pair Manager. Caregivers can use the website to search for caregiving jobs, set their wages, post their weekly availability, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.

Home Health Aides hard to find in 2018

According to a new report conducted by CareerCast, jobs in the caregiving field, including in-home caregiving, and personal care aid, will be hard to fill in 2018. With the rapid growth in the demand for senior care with the Silver Tsunami approaching, there will be an ever-increasing demand for these types of “unskilled” jobs. According to the list provided by CareerCast, health care jobs in general will be five of the top ten most difficult job openings to fill in the coming year and years. Well Beyond Care understands this trend and has already taken steps to see that the need will be filled with qualified employees.

Looking at the list below, home health aides were ranked as the fourth toughest position to fill, with the median salary at only $10.55 per hour, and in parts of the country as low as $8.75 per hour. Personal care aides rang in at No. 8, with a median salary of $8.75 per hours.  Part of what makes WellBeyondCare.com different, is that Caregivers tend to make 25% to 40% more per hour when employed through our system.

Well Beyond Care realizes that over the next eight years the demand for home health aides are forecasted to grow 47%, while personal care aides are anticipated to go 39% over the same time period during to the fact that over 4 million baby boomers per year will be retiring over that same period. This forecast is based on data from trade and professional associations and the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

As a ranking, the 10 toughest jobs to fill in 2018 are:

  1. Application software developer
  2. Construction laborer
  3. Financial advisor
  4. Home health aide
  5. Information security analyst
  6. Medical services manager
  7. Nurse practitioner
  8. Personal care aide
  9. Physical therapist
  10. Truck driver

Due to a large part of how little private duty care companies pay their caregivers and how much they need to charge their clients to make a profit, it is little wonder that in-home care has been facing a labor shortage.  This will become exacerbated as companies like Well Beyond Care start to siphon off more of the higher quality caregivers and as a result, see a raise in hourly wages. Conversely, by using a company like Well Beyond Care a careseeker can actually end up playing a caregiver $3 to $5 more per hour, and still save between $10,000 to $30,000 per year in caregiving costs.

Well Beyond Care gives caregivers and those who need care the tools to manage their in-home care online. Caregivers, registered nurses, certified nurse assistants, and geriatric care managers can use the website to be best matched with Careseekers looking for care, set their wages, post their weekly availability, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Careseekers and family members looking for someone to give care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified nurses, CNAs and caregivers, are matched with a caregiver who can best can deliver care to specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules and payment online and receive personal support from the nurse that is assigned to them when they join. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.

Hiring a Caregiver Tips

Hiring a caregiver for the elderly, especially for one or both of your parents, involves having to expend a great deal of effort and time, and commits you to major decision that affect not only your aging parents, but possibly your entire family. Hiring a caregiver for your parents requires a number of considerations in order to arrive at a well-informed decision regarding the kind of geriatric care that your elderly parents may require. In hiring a caregiver, the needs of your parents, as well as your capacity to financially provide for these needs, are just two among the many considerations you may have to keep to mind.

Determine what type of caregiver you need

While conducting your caregiver search, it is important to first determine what kind of care your parent requires. For instance, you should think about the types of skills your parent needs their caregiver to have, the amount of relevant experience your parent may require, the gender of the caregiver your parent prefers, as well as other non-quantifiable qualifications as well. Knowing the skills requirements that your elderly parent may call for in a caregiver should greatly help you narrow down your private duty care professional search.

Formulate a care plan

Along with the type of caregiver you need, you are going to have to take into consideration what types of care is going to be delivered and when. This is also known as a care plan, or a written plan that describes the services and care your loved one needs for their health condition. Sometimes, a care plan must be prepared or approved by your doctor.

Decide on a schedule

Depending on the needs spelled out in the care plan of your elderly parent, the duration of the care required may vary greatly. For instance, you can call for a personal care assistant to work days or nights, or for overnight stays. You may only need to hire a part-time nurse for when your parent only needs a few hours of skilled medical care a day. You should also determine how many hours per week and how many days a month the caregiver may need to be of service to your elderly parent. In the case where your parent calls for round-the-clock care, you should consider hiring three or more caregivers to keep overall costs down, especially when considering overtime and duties performed.

Determine a budget

Determining a budget for your parent’s geriatric care is a decision that may require agreement from a number of your family members. Since this concerns the financial matters affecting your family, it would be wise to involve everyone involved in the process of looking for a caregiver for your parent. At this phase it is also important to determine who among the family members can contribute financially and to what the extent the contribution will be given. It is important to note when you hire a caregiver, financial considerations are one of the most important factors.

Start searching for a caregiver in your area

In your caregiver search, it is best to look for someone who resides within your immediate area. The closer the better. You can try looking for caregivers in local health care agencies, local advertisements, or employment publications. As a more convenient method, it may be better to look for healthcare professionals online by using trusted sites like WellBeyondCare.com that usually have a large listing of caregivers of various skills sets, training, experience, locations and pay ranges.

Conduct an interview and hire them

After searching for a caregiver, select a number of qualified prospects who match your skills requirements, temperament and “rightness of fit” for an interview. Interviews allow you to verify the qualifications of your prospective home care professional. On a site such as WellBeyondCare.com, conducting personal interviews may be easier as this website allows you to get in touch with your prospective caregiver right away and offers you tips on what you should look for in and what questions you should ask a prospective caregiver. As soon as you have interviewed a few caregivers and are satisfied with the caregiver that you have chosen, then it is time to make a hiring decision and start your parent’s in-home care.  One of the first things you should do prior to hiring any caregiver is do a background check that can detect any criminal history and a reference check. It is best if you leave this to 3rd party suppliers.

Well Beyond Care provides the tools that help you plan care and allow your loved ones to safely age in place. It is the only company that teaches families and individuals how to find and manage affordable non-medical in-home care, while solving the chronic problems of caregiver truancy and turnover. Our platform combines the power of the internet with the personal touch of nurses to offer families a pathway to transitional care, allowing our elderly parents to safely age-in-place. This solution lowers stress in hiring a caregiver and saves families tens of thousands of dollars per year in care costs. Its online system combines the best in Caregiver matching (searching, screening, ratings & hiring) with all the back-office functions (time worked, payroll, scheduling, and notifications) to ensure safe, reliable, dependable, affordable care is obtained. It is the only company that gives each Careseeker access to their own local, personal nurse to help guide them through the hiring process. The Careseeker’s nurse provides advice on healthcare options and aids with transitional care.

Common Diseases Seniors Face and Challenges in Providing Healthcare Solutions

Due to aging, diet, and living styles, seniors are more prone to degenerative diseases. As people age they become more susceptible to diseases and conditions that make even simple tasks difficult. Routine activities like grocery shopping, preparing meals and running errands become harder as we get older and adopt a sedentary lifestyle, which is why many elderly people seek assistance from caregivers. Though aging is a reality of life, it is important to know which specific diseases are most common among seniors in order to decide a course of action of prevention, and barring that, then which type of care or assistance is best for your needs.

According to a recent article in the New York Times, the most common diseases among seniors in the U.S. are Alzheimer’s or any other form of dementia, high blood pressure, heart disease, depression, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Each of these illnesses can have dramatic effects on the quality of life of seniors and their families. Caring for an aging parent with dementia or depression can be especially trying. And while there are some precautions one can take to avoid such diseases, like leading a healthy lifestyle, the inevitable deterioration associated with old age is the leading factor that make seniors vulnerable (Medicinenet, 2013).

Though these conditions may manifest alone as a single disease, the problem gets worse as these conditions overlap. According to recent studies, having one of these diseases may make an elderly patient more susceptible to contracting others. Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy, a psychiatry professor at Duke University, suggests that there is a link between dementia and vascular diseases. Studies aimed at establishing these connections are currently under way. As these ailments and conditions coexist, seniors suffer more and start to need more care. These overlapping health conditions also call for more specialized care for the senior; they need a caregiver or nurse who has experience working with patients suffering from similar comorbidities.

To date, more than 733,000 Americans live in assisted living facilities (ALFs) (New York Times, 2013). These popular living arraignments for seniors and people with disabilities offer an easy solution for their families if they can afford it. Depending on the preferred facility, level of care required, and professionals called for to provide care, yearly rates may vary, but the cost of living in a nursing home or assisted living facility has increased consistently for the past five years and typically costs about $80,000 annually. With such high costs, many families are looking for more affordable alternatives without sacrificing the quality of care and stability for their loved ones.

Many healthcare professionals, including Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs), are moving away from the old model of finding jobs in an established geriatric living facility. Uncertainty about the future of the healthcare industry has driven many qualified medical professionals to operate independently, working for private pay and visiting the patients in their homes. This limits the cost of care and allows aging loved ones to remain in their own homes.

The number of seniors who need personal care is ever increasing in the US. These individuals and their families have enough stress in their lives dealing with illnesses and deteriorating health, that the addition of navigating the waters of elderly care is simply too difficult to take on alone. Fortunately there are many resources available today that can help seniors and their loved ones find the care they need at a cost they can afford.

Well Beyond Care gives caregivers and those who need care the tools to manage their in-home care online. Caregivers, registered nurses, certified nurse assistants, and geriatric care managers can use the website to be best matched with Careseekers looking for care, set their wages, post their weekly availability, receive weekly payment, and build their resume and portfolio with real experience. Careseekers and family members looking for someone to give care for their parents or loved ones, can use the website to search for qualified nurses, CNAs and caregivers, are matched with a caregiver who can best can deliver care to specific care needs, monitor their caregivers’ schedules and payment online and receive personal support from the nurse that is assigned to them when they join. Join for free today at WellBeyondCare.com.

Well Beyond Care on Golden Years

Lauren Tarrant & Jeffrey Fry were on “Dr. Mara Karpel & Your Golden Years” program today. Hear more about Well Beyond Care’s progress  on this podcast (start at 9:35 and end at 40:45).

They go over the company’s progress to date and our mission on helping families find affordable, reliable, quality care. Great interview and very informative.